Cruise Day In History Forgotten Again

August 15, just 10 days ago, was supposed to be an important day in the cruise world. It passed quietly. Headlines were that tensions had eased in Ferguson, Missouri…and that Iraq’s prime minister had stepped down.

This was supposed to be the Panama Canal’s day. August 15 was the Canal’s biggest Canal-SSAnconbirthday, the day it turned 100. As a Centenarian, it was to be all dressed, posing for pictures, having friends over for tea, popping the champagne.

Most of all, it was to have spread its passage and opened new locks. To have an offspring at 100 would make headlines anywhere, but especially at the Isthmus of Panama, where today’s biggest ships were going to be allowed in, and out, revolutionizing the shipping industry and making it possible for big cruise ships to go east-to-west-to-east like smaller ones do.

crPanCanal.comReality rained on the Canal’s parade. Construction delays for the “third lock” pushed the opening back. And back. And back some more.

Now, it’s to be December 15.

Next year.

Thousands of ships have used this man-made miracle since August 15, 2014, the day the S.S. Ancon (above) became the first ship through it. Traffic made what was enormous into a canal that time outgrew. Always an attraction for people riding cruise ships with bucket lists in hand, the Canal was going to become relevant again as a tourist attraction. People who saw the old wanted to see the new.

Maybe it shouldn’t have been a surprise that the Panama Canal was overshadowed like that. A hundred years earlier, on the day the S.S. Ancon made history, there was a war underway in Europe. On that day, the good guys began the Battle of Cer, the first Allied victory of World War I and the beginning of the end for the German Army.

Diagram courtesy of PanCanal.com

Today at portsandbows.com: Breaking news on Quantum

Grand Princess
7 nights
January 3, 2015
Los Angeles (return): Puerto Vallarta, Mazatlan, Cabo San Lucas
Inside: $499
Cost per day: $71
www.princess.com

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