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Times To Butt Out Of Ship Casinos

The world continues to close in on smokers. One of the last places where smokers can still light up are gaming establishments. For whatever reason, smoking and gambling seem to be partners.

On land and at sea.

Casinos on land usually have a non-smoking area. Presumably, these areas will grow in size as there are more non-smokers, which seems to be happening in society. Casinos at Casino smoke-freesea aren’t usually large enough to designate a portion of the space as non-smoking. Instead, they’ve done what we noticed — and not for the first time — on the Star Princess.

Smoke-free days.

A day or two per cruise is earmarked as non-smoking on a growing number of cruise ships. On the Star Princess, during a one-week Alaska cruise, there were two. In Asia, where it feels like a higher percentage of the population smokes, in many large outdoor areas — from Angkor Wat in Cambodia and the Cu Chi Tunnels in Vietnam — smoking is not allowed.

If you’re one of the people who stays away from cruise-ship casinos because you can’t deal with the smoke, let the cruise line know. And if you’re one of the passengers who would stay away from the casino if you couldn’t smoke, let the cruise line know.

In the end, the impact on the cruise line’s bottom line is likely to determine how often the “no smoking” signs will be posted.

Today at portsandbows.com: Excursion options on Silversea World Cruise 

Norwegian Jewel
5 nights
September 29, 2015
Vancouver, Victoria, Astoria, Los Angeles
Inside: $199
Cost per day: $39
www.ncl.com

Case Against Smokers Thickens

Earlier this year, there was yet another independent survey on smoking. Specifically, smoking on cruise ships.

Doing the math was, if nothing else, interesting.

According to the survey, 48% of cruisers want smoking on cruise ships banned. Completely. No smoking on the deck, nor in the stateroom, bar or designated smoking area. Butt out.

According to the survey, another 27% want smokers to be in a designated area. Butt in.

And 14% said smoking should be allowed in cabins. They’re the hard-cores.

The bottom line is the day will come when smoking is banned on cruise ships, or at least some of them. Positioned as pariahs in the western world, smokers are losing their independence…first because reformed smokers have made them that, and increasingly because it is becoming “illegal” to smoke in public places.

But that’s public places in countries. What country is sea?

DAILY DEAL:
Grand Princess
14 nights
November 24, 2012
Fort Lauderdale (return): Back-to-back Caribbean
Inside $1,198
www.princess.com

Smokers Getting Squeezed on Ships

Our daughter, expecting their first child later this year, can’t (or, like the good mother-to-be, won’t) go into U.S. casinos. They are among the last bastions to be conquered by the anti-smoking brigade…smoking and gambling traditionally make standard bedfellows.

Cruise ships, slowly, are falling into line.

Two months ago, Princess announced there would be no smoking in staterooms and balconies on its ships, effective January 15. Yesterday, Norwegian announced the same thing for staterooms, but not balconies, also in January. Carnival has the same policy going into effect in December.

In this age when smokers are given leper-like status, most people would say this about the changing policies of cruise lines: “It’s a good start.”

There is inconsistency even within a cruise line. For example, Royal Caribbean ships allow smoking on balconies. Celebrity, owned by Royal Caribbean, prohibits smoking on balconies (also in casinos). Balconies on Azamara ships, also owned by Royal Caribbean, are non-smoking. But Pullmantur, a member of the same family, allows smoking everywhere.

The other extreme is Oceania. No smoking, bow to stern.

That would suit our daughter, not to mention more and more cruise passengers.

Will Princess Puff Policy Spread?

News item: Princess Cruises to prohibit smoking in staterooms and on balconies. You know what this really means, don’t you?

Democracy’s at work.

The decision by Princess — likely to become the industry standard — is the result of consumer studies. It will take effect early next year.

“Smokers are a small minority of our customers,” says Executive Vice-President Jan Swartz, “and the large majority of passengers value having their primary living space onboard smoke-free.”

Because we have always lived in a democracy, we’ve always tried to subscribe to “majority rules” even in this age where often “minority rules” because the minority has the loudest voices or the squeakiest wheels. In this case, Princess is responding to changing customer preferences.

Remember when restaurants and office buildings were doing the same thing (even if it was in many cases legislated)? There was an outcry from smokers. Today, it is accepted.

The same thing will soon happen on the seas…everywhere.

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